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Striking rail staff want 7% pay rises and no extension to 35 hour week, RMT boss Mick Lynch reveals


Union chiefs behind next week’s disruptive rail strikes have today revealed they are pushing for inflation-linked pay rises of at least 7 per cent for workers.

Mick Lynch, the general secretary of the Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers union (RMT), today said any pay deal should be linked to the Retail Price Index (RPI) – the rate of inflation on goods and services.

The inflation measure, calculated by the Office of National Statistics (ONS), was at 11.1 per cent in April. But Mr Lynch said union chiefs were pushing for a pay deal linked to talks in December, when it was at 7.1 per cent. He said the union had rejected a Network Rail offer of a 2 per cent rise with a further 1 per cent increase linked to job cuts.

But ministers today described the decision to strike as an ‘act of self harm’ on the UK rail industry – which has suffered a dramatic drop in customers since the Covid pandemic – and accused militant union barons of ‘gunning’ for ‘disastrous’ industrial action. 

Speaking to Sky News’ Sophy Ridge, Mr Lynch said: ‘At the time of the Network Rail pay deal, which should have been done in December, it was 7.1 per cent, the Retail Price Index,’

‘That’s what the cost of living would have been at the time these deals should have been struck, so we’re going to negotiate to see if we can get a deal that reflects that cost of living.

How Britain’s rail network will grind to a halt due to multiple strikes amid ‘summer of discontent’ 

  • June 21: RMT and Unite strike on London Underground
  • June 21, 23 and 25: RMT strike on Network Rail and 13 train operators, also affecting services on June 22, 24 and 26
  • June 26: Separate Aslef strike on Hull trains
  • June 28-29 and July 13-14: Aslef strike on Croydon Tramlink
  • July 20: When c2c, LNER and Northern workers could go on strike if TSSA members vote for action 
  • From July 25: When Network Rail strike action could take place if TSSA members vote for it in ballot

‘There a number of ways in which you can put value into a package, it’s not all about straightforward pay. So we’ll talk to them constructively, but they’re making offers that are nowhere near that. 

‘And for half the people in this dispute, there’s no offer at all and for many of them it’s the third year where there’s no offer and no proposal.’

He also claimed railways bosses were attempting to extend the 35-hour weeks for workers – resulting in lower pay deals – and that his union wanted assurance over potential jobs cuts in the future.

It comes as RMT workers are set to go on strike next week, sparking rail misery for millions of Britons. The action will take place across 13 train operators and Network Rail on Tuesday, Thursday and next Saturday. There will also be a London Underground strike on Tuesday.

Rail passengers have been urged not to travel by train during next week’s strike action – with some operators even warning commuters of serious disruption to schedules on non-strike days next week due to a knock-on effect. A number of events have also been cancelled as a result of the strikes.  

Last night it was announced that discussions between unions and Network Rail, train operators and London Underground had failed, ending hope of an 11th hour-deal to call off the strikes.

Today Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said the strike was ‘disastrous’ for passengers and that would ‘inconvenience millions of British workers’. He also lashed out at union barons, who he said were ‘gunning for a strike’ and claimed the RMT were ‘jeopardising the future of the railway itself’ by pushing back against the railways being ‘modernised’.

But Mr Lynch did not appear to back down during a round of TV interviews this morning. He said workers were being ‘robbed of wages’ due to soaring inflation rates.

And in a move that will further concern ministers he did not rule rail strikes beyond this month’s planned action. He also warned other sectors could follow in his union’s footsteps by calling their own industrial action.

Mr Lynch told Sky News’ Sophy Ridge On Sunday programme: ‘I think there are going to be many unions balloting across the country, because people can’t take it anymore.

‘We have got people who doing full time jobs who are having to take state benefits and use food banks. That is a national disgrace.’

RMT general secretary Mick Lynch claimed public sector workers were being 'robbed of wages' due to soaring inflation rates

RMT general secretary Mick Lynch claimed public sector workers were being ‘robbed of wages’ due to soaring inflation rates

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps accused the RMT leader of 'gunning' for strike action throughout negotiations

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps accused the RMT leader of ‘gunning’ for strike action throughout negotiations

However Mr Lynch insisted the RMT did not ‘want to be the cause of disruption in people’s lives’. He said:  ‘We want a settlement to this dispute. But we’re facing a crisis for our members. We’re faced with thousands of job cuts – despite what Grant Shapps says – there’s no guarantee these redundancies won’t be compulsory.

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps says strikes are a ‘huge act of self-harm’ which could jeopardise the future of the UK rail industry 

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps has warned the country’s biggest rail union that this week’s strikes will be a ‘huge act of self-harm’ which could jeopardise the future of the industry.

Mr Shapps dismissed a call from the Rail, Maritime and Transport (RMT) union for the Government to intervene as a ‘stunt’, saying the union had been ‘gunning’ for industrial action for weeks.

However, Labour said ministers needed to step in to prevent the network ‘grinding to a halt’ in a dispute over pay, conditions and job losses.

On Saturday, the RMT confirmed that strikes at Network Rail and 13 train operators will go ahead on Tuesday, Thursday and next Saturday, and on London Underground on Tuesday.

General secretary Mick Lynch said the union had no choice but to act after the train operators had still not made a pay offer when talks adjourned on Thursday.

‘What else are we to do? Are we to plead? Are we to beg? We want to bargain for our futures. We want to negotiate,’ he told Sky News’s Sophy Ridge on Sunday programme.

Mr Shapps, however, said the union had been ‘gunning’ for industrial action for weeks and accused it of ‘punishing’ millions of ‘innocent people’ who will be affected by the strikes.

‘Of course, it is a reality that if we can’t get these railways modernised, if we can’t get the kind of efficiency that will mean that they can work on behalf of the travelling public, then of course it is jeopardising the future of the railway itself,’ he told the Sophy Ridge on Sunday programme.

‘I think it is a huge act of self-harm to go on strike at the moment. I don’t believe the workers are anywhere near as militant as their unions who are leading them up the garden path. They are gunning for this strike. It is completely unnecessary.

‘There is a sensible pay deal, there is a sensible modernisation of the railway which would enable much more flexibility, but the unions need to understand the world has changed and people don’t necessarily need to travel in the way they did in the past.’

 

‘We’ve seen four or five thousands jobs already go from the railway. They’ve told our maintenance staff on Network Rail that three thousand jobs will go.

‘They’re going to cut back on the safety regime, they’ve told us that every single booking office in Britain will close.

‘They’ve told us that they’re going to extend the working week from 35 hours to 40, or possibly 44.

‘And for new entrants that will mean lower wages. So they’re actually proposing pay cuts, not a pay rise, and an increase in working time on the railway.’

The RMT general secretary insisted his union was ‘not asking for special treatment’. 

‘We’ve had pay cuts – most of our members have not had a pay rise for two to three years. I’m talking about actual pay cuts, the reduction of salaries, as well as the losses against the rate of inflation.’

He later told LBC that workers must be offered an acceptable settlement within the next 48 hours.

He said: ‘We’ve got a threat to jobs, we want a guarantee of no compulsory redundancies. We’ve got the threat to working conditions, which is a really important part of this dispute. Terms and conditions and working practices are threatened with being shredded.

‘We’ve got the pay issue which is ongoing now, most of our members haven’t had a pay rise for two or three years and that includes Network Rail and all other train companies.’

It comes as Mr Shapps today warned next week’s strike would be ‘disastrous’ for the rail industry.

He told Sky News: ‘It is a huge mistake. The unions have been gunning for this strike throughout. This strike is completely unnecessary.

‘It is going to inconvenience millions of people – students doing their GCSEs and A-levels, people trying to get to hospitals to try get operations that have been postponed, perhaps, during coronavirus.

‘It is disastrous. It is no way to behave on the railway. There is no advantage to this. I know Mick Lynch says he is ‘nostalgic for union power’ but this is no way to behave.’

The Transport Secretary also dismissed calls from the RMT for the Government to step in to resolve the rail dispute as a ‘stunt’.

‘The trade unions know that only the trade union and the employer can settle this,’ he said.

‘I will not cut across that. I will not undermine the employer’s works.

‘This is a stunt at the 11th hour by the union, suddenly coming forward and saying ‘We need to negotiate with the Government now’ even though this last month they told me they wouldn’t be seen dead negotiating with the Government.’

In a warning about the impact of industrial action on the future of Britain’s rail network, Mr Shapps added: ‘Of course, it is a reality that if we can’t get these railways modernised, if we can’t get the kind of efficiency that will mean that they can work on behalf of the travelling public, then of course it is jeopardising the future of the railway itself.

‘I think it is a huge act of self-harm to go on strike at the moment. I don’t believe the workers are anywhere as militant as their unions who are leading them up the garden path. They are gunning for this strike. It is completely unnecessary.’ 

It comes as Mr Lynch yesterday revealed nationwide travel chaos could drag on well into 2023 – as he compared himself to Thatcher’s foil Arthur Scargill and said he’s ‘nostalgic’ for the era of the Miners’ Strike.

Mike Lynch said last night he'd be more than willing to extend the RMT strike window into 2023, prolonging the disruption

Mike Lynch said last night he’d be more than willing to extend the RMT strike window into 2023, prolonging the disruption

National Union of Mineworkers boss Arthur Scargill took on Thatcher in the mid-1980s - and was defeated

National Union of Mineworkers boss Arthur Scargill took on Thatcher in the mid-1980s – and was defeated

Unite, Unison, RMT and TUC members gathered at Parliament Square on Saturday afternoon to protest the cost-of-living

Unite, Unison, RMT and TUC members gathered at Parliament Square on Saturday afternoon to protest the cost-of-living

Rail strike will cost hospitality businesses ‘over a billion pound’, warns industry chief 

Next week’s rail strikes could devastate Britain’s post-Covid recovery and cost key industries over a billion pounds, the Government has been told.

Kate Nicholls, chief executive of industry group UK Hospitality, warned tourism and leisure businesses were already fragile after pandemic lockdowns and would take a ‘big hit’.

Speaking to Times Radio, Ms Nicholls said: ‘At the best, we think it’s going to take a hit to hospitality revenues of over half a billion pounds.

‘But that presupposes that many people will travel on those shoulder days when the trains and the Tubes will still be disrupted – it could be more significant than that.

‘And if you look across the whole tourism, and leisure and theatre industries as a whole, you are definitely looking at an economic hit of over a billion pounds.’

Strikes on Network Rail and 13 other train operators are expected on three days next week, while London Underground workers will walk out on Tuesday.

There is some optimism, however, that commuters will find alternative routes to travel into city and town centres.

Stagecoach, the country’s biggest bus and coach operator, said that next week’s bookings for its Megabus service had spiked by 85%.

Ms Nicholls said tourism and hospitality businesses had already been damaged by the cost-of-living crisis and urged the Government, rail networks and the RMT to reach an agreement.

‘Next week’s strikes are so devastating because… we were starting to get back on our feet, starting to rebuild those cash reserves,’ she said.

‘This is a big hit next week where we will lose the best part of a week’s income for many of those town centre, and particularly central London, businesses.

‘We would urge all sides in this dispute to try and come together to resolve this issue so that we don’t put commuters, visitors, tourists at a disadvantage and we don’t damage our businesses.’

 

Lynch gave a fiery speech to union members at Parliament Square on Saturday afternoon in which he declared ‘class war’ and accused his opponents of trying to ‘butcher the working class’. 

Having voted in favour of strike action last month, RMT members are permitted to take part in walkouts till November.

Extending that six-month mandate would mean stretching the nationwide travel chaos well into 2023. Lynch said he is more than willing to do so.

He told the FT: ‘We will renew the mandates until we get a settlement to the problems in the dispute.

‘Until there is a settlement there will be a campaign of strike action, and other unions will join us . . . I expect there to be more strikes.’

And in a second interview this weekend, Lynch revealed he has modelled his approach on Arthur Scargill.

He said: ‘I’m nostalgic for the power that we had and more nostalgic for the control and values that we had’, The Sun reported.

Lynch added: ‘People talk about the Winter of Discontent and the excesses of the trade union movement as it was styled and characterised. They had good reason for that because they had very powerful unions.

‘I’m nostalgic for the balance we were creating. I think society was becoming rebalanced in the 70s.’

The RMT chief’s pay and perks package is worth just under £125,000.

In a furious rant earlier on Saturday, Lynch urged Labour MPs to ‘stand up and fight with us’ at a rally attended by the party’s deputy leader, Angela Rayner.

More than 40,000 members of RMT will stage 24-hour walkouts on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday in a dispute over proposed job losses and their demand for pay hikes that will keep pace with inflation. 

Only one in five trains will run on the three strike days, but services will also be hugely disrupted during the rest of the week.

The number of trains travelling London to Glasgow on Tuesday will be slashed from 17 to just four, with the last departing at 1.30pm. 

The number from London to Birmingham will fall from 82 to eight and between Manchester and Leeds from eight an hour to just one.

Network Rail and RMT negotiators will hold last-ditch talks today but hopes of any breakthrough appear to have vanished after Lynch’s speech at the We Demand Better march organised by the Trades Union Congress (TUC) in Central London.

Appearing on a stage in Parliament Square, he said: ‘There is no compromise that has been given to us and the message is clear: we are in a class struggle now.’

Challenging Labour MPs to back the national strike he added: ‘Are you going to be with us or are you going to sit on the sidelines while these Tories butcher the working class all over this country? Stand up and fight with us or get out of the way.’

Lynch challenged MPs not backing the strikes: 'Which side are you on? Stand up and fight'

Lynch challenged MPs not backing the strikes: ‘Which side are you on? Stand up and fight’

Thousands gathered at Parliament Square for the TUC-organised rally against the cost of living

Thousands gathered at Parliament Square for the TUC-organised rally against the cost of living

Starmer (right) appeared with Labour allies on Wakefield doorsteps today, opting to get out of London as the rally took place

Starmer (right) appeared with Labour allies on Wakefield doorsteps today, opting to get out of London as the rally took place

The firebrand suggested that no deal has yet been offered to the union during talks. ‘We have got nothing to settle with,’ he said.  We will keep this strike going until we get a settlement.

‘The campaign is on. The fight is on. The struggle is on. Who’s with us? The working people are with us. We are the working people of this country. Together we are unstoppable. Get up and fight or live on your knees.

‘The struggle is on. Bring it on. This is the fight of our lives. Stand up and fight. Victory to the RMT!’

The incendiary speech was met with dismay by Network Rail bosses who have described negotiating with the far-Left union as like ‘dealing with people stuck in the 1980s.’

Labour's deputy leader Angela Rayner attended the rally. Keir Starmer is in Wakefield today

Labour’s deputy leader Angela Rayner attended the rally. Keir Starmer is in Wakefield today

TUC general secretary Frances O'Grady said Grant Shapps could find himself redundant

TUC general secretary Frances O’Grady said Grant Shapps could find himself redundant

End of the line: Plans for ALL rail ticket offices are to close as sales go online despite fears 3million over-65s who don’t have internet access 

All ticket offices on Britain’s railways are set to close as the rail industry looks to move its ticketing operations exclusively online.

The industry has drawn up plans to phase out paper tickets and either shut down or ‘repurpose’ hundreds of ticket offices across England in a move expected to save up to £500million a year.

But the planned shift to online ticketing has raised concerns that Britain’s elderly population, who may not have access to smartphones or be technologically savvy enough to use them, would struggle to travel via the trains.

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said earlier this week that one in eight train tickets are still bought over the counter. 

And the UK’s largest charity for older people, Age UK, says up to 3 million elderly folk in Britain do not have access to the internet, while many more are thought to live without a mobile device.

Caroline Abrahams of Age UK told The Times: ‘Many more [older people] lack an up-to-date smartphone or tablet, or live in a place with unreliable broadband. These people have relied on buying tickets face-to-face or over the phone and then collecting them from a station machine. What are they expected to do if everything goes online?’ 

 

One senior Network Rail source said: ‘The chances of finding a way through this are slim. The rhetoric I have seen from Mick and the RMT doesn’t exactly fill us with rosy expectations.’ 

Lynch’s tirade will renew pressure on Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer to unequivocally condemn the strike. 

His deputy Angela Rayner, dressed in an animal print jumpsuit, yesterday joined the march, along with fellow Opposition frontbencher Wes Streeting. 

Ms Rayner later posted a ‘selfie’ picture with TUC general secretary Frances O’Grady with the caption: ‘Proud to march together.’

Demonstrators carried placards emblazoned with slogans including ‘If our pay doesn’t rise we will’ and ‘wages up, bills down, Tories out’. At least one carried a Soviet flag.

Despite Lynch’s suggestion that no deal was on the table, The Mail on Sunday can reveal that the RMT last week rejected a pay offer from Network Rail worth potentially more than 3 per cent – the same as nurses and other NHS staff are expected to be offered.

Network Rail’s negotiators offered signallers and maintenance staff a two per cent hike, plus an additional one per cent if productivity targets are hit. 

A further cash bonus was also offered if working practices were overhauled, but the offer was immediately rejected. 

‘There was frustration it didn’t land as well as we hoped it might,’ the Network Rail source said.

‘For a lot of other public workers that would be a decent recognition of their hard work but we recognise that the RMT want more – and we want more in terms of our ability to modernise the railway for the future. If there can be some more compromise there, then there could still be a deal to be had.’

Hospitality bosses predict the strikes will cost the sector more than £500 million as it recovers from the pandemic, with spending expected to fall 20 per cent in towns and cities.

The strike will also cause chaos for those travelling to a string of high-profile events during one of the busiest weeks of the summer and is set to create huge traffic jams as millions take to the roads to get to work. 

Simon Williams from the RAC said: ‘The train strikes are going to put a lot more pressure on the road network. People will have to get up early to try and beat others using the roads.’

Lynch, described as a 'hard-nosed negotiator', addressed the crowd of hundreds earlier on

Lynch, described as a ‘hard-nosed negotiator’, addressed the crowd of hundreds earlier on

London Victoria Train station has been flooded with holidaymakers ahead of the strike

London Victoria Train station has been flooded with holidaymakers ahead of the strike 

Union members are set to walk out most of next week, bringing rail networks across the country to a grinding halt

Union members are set to walk out most of next week, bringing rail networks across the country to a grinding halt

One RMT leader chants as they take part in the 'We Demand Better' rally, which began near Oxford Street and ended in SW1

One RMT leader chants as they take part in the ‘We Demand Better’ rally, which began near Oxford Street and ended in SW1

Striking rail workers are expected to form picket lines outside rail depots and stations across the country, including at King’s Cross, Euston and Liverpool Street station in London, amid fears that staff who agree to work will face intimidation. 

The Mail on Sunday understands that British Transport Police and private security companies have been put on standby in case violence breaks out.

Meanwhile, parents voiced their anger as tens of thousands of GCSE and A-level students face disruption to their exams. Seventeen GCSE exams are due to be held across the country this week, while A-levels including English, maths and science, are also scheduled.

Mother-of-five Caroline Farrow, a writer and campaigner, lambasted the RMT on Twitter, writing: ‘There are no words for the contempt many parents, students and schools hold you in, for striking on days when A-levels are taking place.’

Becky Barnham said her 16-year-old daughter had to catch two trains to get to her school in Cheam, South West London, where she is sitting GCSE chemistry and physics exams during the strikes. 

‘The uncertainty is making us think about booking an Airbnb where her school is,’ Ms Barnham said.

Publishing manager Robyn Haque’s 15-year-old daughter, who is sitting her GCSEs, endured a two-hour journey between her East London home and her school in South West London, earlier this month amid an RMT strike on the Underground.

‘Pupils have had quite a disrupted last two years and to deal with this strike on top is just more stress,’ she said.

At the heart of the dispute is pressure to rein in the ballooning cost of the railways as passenger numbers remain about 75 per cent of pre-Covid levels. 

Since the start of the pandemic, the Government has pumped more than £16 billion into the network, the equivalent of more than £600 a household. 

Schedule to the Summer of Discontent: Rail firms reveal radically scaled-back timetables ahead of next week’s crippling strikes… so how are YOUR local trains affected?

This map released today shows the planned rail services on June 21, June 23 and June 25 as the RMT strike is set to cause chaos across Britain. Network Rail has said that no passenger services will serve locations such as Penzance in Cornwall, Bournemouth in Dorset, Swansea in South Wales, Holyhead in North Wales, Chester in Cheshire and Blackpool in Lancashire

This map released today shows the planned rail services on June 21, June 23 and June 25 as the RMT strike is set to cause chaos across Britain. Network Rail has said that no passenger services will serve locations such as Penzance in Cornwall, Bournemouth in Dorset, Swansea in South Wales, Holyhead in North Wales, Chester in Cheshire and Blackpool in Lancashire

Avanti West Coast

Avanti West Coast say that due to the strikes fewer trains will run and some stations and destinations will have no service on the strike days. Our services will also start later and end much earlier.

‘These trains are expected to be very busy, so we strongly advise to only travel by rail if necessary on strike days. If not, please plan ahead as your journey will probably be severely disrupted. Train travel on days either side of the strike days is also likely to be affected,’ an Avanti West Coast spokesperson wanred.

Some services are set to run on the West Coast Main Line between London Euston and Glasgow but with a ‘significantly reduced timetable’. 

C2C 

C2C says it expects ‘significant disruption’ on the strike dates and those in between. 

A spokesperson said: ‘We are advising our passengers to only travel if it is essential, work from home if you can and to plan ahead if you do intend to travel.’

‘On the c2c route, we will be operating a reduced service from 07:30 – 18:30, equating to less than a third of normal service levels, and consisting of:  

Fenchurch Street to Shoeburyness via Laindon: Two trains per hour 

Fenchurch Street to Pitsea via Rainham: Two trains per hour

No trains will run via Ockendon or Chafford Hundred

A spokesperson said: ‘While action is currently limited to 21st, 23rd and 25th, the surrounding dates will also see disruption to services, with services set to start running from around 06:30 with a full service planned to be in operation by 08:00.

Caledonian Sleeper

All services cancelled from Monday to Friday next week.

A spokesperson said: ‘Although Caledonian Sleeper staff are not participating in the strike action it does have a significant impact on our operations and services. Unfortunately, this means that we have had to cancel our services.’

Chiltern Railways

Train services will start at 8am and finish before 6pm. 

Two trains per hour will run to/from London Marylebone – one to Banbury and the other to Aylesbury Vale Parkway via High Wycombe.

Last trains from Marylebone will be the 3.10pm Banbury, 4.10pm to Bicester North and 4.45pm to Aylesbury Vale Parkway via High Wycombe.

Transport for London

TfL services and national rail will be affected by the strikes on Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday. Along with the national strikes, London-wide strikes affecting tubes and TfL services will take place on Tuesday, June 21 and services until mid-morning on Wednesday 22 June.

National rail strike will effect the Elizabeth line and London Overground services, and some Tube services, on strike days and until mid-morning on the days after strikes

LONDON -- This Transport for London map shows greyed-out lines for those that will be affected by disruption next Tuesday all day, and Wednesday morning. 'Severe disruption or no service' is expected on all Tube lines from the start of next Tuesday until at least 8am on Wednesday. Only the Croydon Tramlink and Docklands Light Railway are shown as running normally

LONDON — This Transport for London map shows greyed-out lines for those that will be affected by disruption next Tuesday all day, and Wednesday morning. ‘Severe disruption or no service’ is expected on all Tube lines from the start of next Tuesday until at least 8am on Wednesday. Only the Croydon Tramlink and Docklands Light Railway are shown as running normally

London Underground 

Tuesday:  ‘Severe disruption or no service’ is expected on all London Underground lines for the whole day

Wednesday: No service expected until at least 8am

Thursday and Saturday: Most services operating, but disruption from Queen’s Park to Harrow and Wealdstone on Bakerloo line; on Richmond and Wimbledon branches of the District line; and on the Waterloo and City line

Wednesday, Friday and Sunday: Tube customers using sections of lines affected by national rail action (listed above) should avoid making journeys until mid-morning.

Saturday and Sunday: No Waterloo & City line 

Sunday: No District line between Turnham Green and Richmond. 

Night Tube

Friday and Saturday night: Continued strike action means three trains per hour on the Victoria line and Jubilee lines, and two per hour on the Central line 

London Overground 

Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday: Limited service between 7.30am and 6.30pm due to national strike

Wednesday, Friday and Sunday: Possible disruption 

Monday to Thursday: No service between Romford and Upminster

Monday to Friday: Changes to early and late trains on the Richmond / Clapham Junction to Stratford line; and the Gospel Oak to Barking line 

Saturday and Sunday: No service between Sydenham and West Croydon; or Gospel Oak and Barking

Sunday: No service between Willesden Junction and Richmond; or Surrey Quays and Clapham Junction

Elizabeth Line 

Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday: Reduced service

National rail strike will effect the Elizabeth line (pictured) and London Overground services, and some Tube services, on strike days and until mid-morning on the days after strikes

National rail strike will effect the Elizabeth line (pictured) and London Overground services, and some Tube services, on strike days and until mid-morning on the days after strikes

Wednesday and Friday: Possible disruption

Sunday: No service between Paddington and Abbey Wood

DLR (Docklands Light Railway)

Tuesday: Services running but are ‘likely to be extremely busy with queues to board’. Possible closures for safety reasons at stations also served by Underground

Wednesday to Friday: Normal service expected 

Saturday and Sunday: No service between Bank / Tower Gateway and Poplar / West India Quay

London Buses 

Tuesday to Sunday: Normal service planned, but could be ‘extremely busy’ when strikes affect other services 

Croydon TramLink

Tuesday to Sunday: Normal service planned, but higher demand likely due to strike on rail services 

Emirates Airline Cable Car 

Tuesday to Sunday: Normal cable car service planned

Santander Cycles 

Tuesday to Sunday: Higher demand likely as people cycle instead, with teams ensuring bicycles for hire are ‘distributed at key locations according to demand’

Southern

Although Southern colleagues are not on strike, this national action will severely affect all journeys on Southern, Gatwick Express, Thameslink and Great Northern between Tuesday 21 June and Sunday 26 June. 

‘We’re really sorry if this affects your journey plans,’ Southern said on its website.

‘Between Tuesday 21 June and Sunday 26 June inclusive, please only travel if your journey is absolutely necessary, and expect severe disruption.’

Southern say it will operate limited opening hours with services starting later and finishing much earlier than usual. On strike days, the last trains will finish late afternoon. 

‘Please check your first and last trains carefully, as there will be no alternative travel outside of these services,’ Southern added.

GREAT NORTHERN, GATWICK EXPRESS, SOUTHERN AND THAMESLINK: This map from Govia Thameslink Railway shows the trains expected to operate on its network during strike action next week on June 21, 23 and 25 - a fraction of normal services

GREAT NORTHERN, GATWICK EXPRESS, SOUTHERN AND THAMESLINK: This map from Govia Thameslink Railway shows the trains expected to operate on its network during strike action next week on June 21, 23 and 25 – a fraction of normal services 

Services between London Bridge / London Victoria and South coast

London Victoria and Brighton: Two trains per hour will run between London Victoria and Brighton, calling at London Victoria, Clapham Junction, East Croydon, Gatwick Airport, Haywards Heath and Brighton only.

London Bridge and Brighton: Two trains per hour will run between London Bridge and Brighton, calling at London Bridge, East Croydon, Gatwick Airport, Three Bridges, Balcombe, Hayward’s Heath, Wivelsfield, Burgess Hill, Hassocks, Preston Park and Brighton only.

London Bridge and Gatwick Airport: Two trains per hour will run between London Bridge and Gatwick Airport, calling at London Bridge, Norwood Junction, East Croydon, Purley, Redhill, Earlswood, Salfords, Horley and Gatwick Airport only.

London Bridge and Three Bridges: Two trains per hour will run between London Bridge and Three Bridges, calling at London Bridge, Norwood Junction, East Croydon, Coulsdon South, Merstham, Redhill, Horley, Gatwick Airport and Three Bridges only.

Brighton and Hove: Two trains per hour will run between Brighton and Hove only.

Services between London Bridge / London Victoria and South London

London Victoria and Sutton: Two trains per hour will run between London Victoria and Epsom, calling at London Victoria, Clapham Junction, Balham, Mitcham Eastfields, Mitcham Junction, Hackbridge, Carshalton, and Sutton only.

London Victoria and Epsom Downs via Selhurst: Two trains per hour will run between London Victoria and Epsom Downs, calling at London Victoria, Battersea Park, Clapham Junction, Wandsworth Common, Balham, Streatham Common, Norbury, Thornton Heath, Selhurst, West Croydon, Waddon, Wallington, Carshalton Beeches, Sutton, Belmont, Banstead and Epsom Downs only.

London Victoria and West Croydon via Crystal Palace: Two trains per hour will run between London Victoria and West Croydon, calling at London Victoria, Battersea Park, Clapham Junction, Balham, Streatham Hill, West Norwood, Gipsy Hill, Crystal Palace, Norwood Junction and West Croydon only.

London Bridge and Tattenham Corner: Two trains per hour will run between London Bridge and Tattenham Corner, calling at London Bridge, East Croydon, South Croydon, Purley Oaks, Purley, Reedham, Coulsdon Town, Woodmansterne, Chipstead, Kingswood, Tadworth and Tattenham Corner only.

Thameslink 

Many stations and routes will be closed and trains will only be able to run during limited hours from around 7.15am and will finish in the late afternoon. There will be no alternative travel options after the last trains. 

‘This means, if you do have to travel, you should carefully check the first and last train for your station. Expect these trains to be very busy,’ Thameslink say.

Many stations and routes will be closed and ThamesLink (pictured: Library image) trains will only be able to run during limited hours from around 7.15am and will finish in the late afternoon. There will be no alternative travel options after the last trains.

Many stations and routes will be closed and ThamesLink (pictured: Library image) trains will only be able to run during limited hours from around 7.15am and will finish in the late afternoon. There will be no alternative travel options after the last trains.

Services between St Pancras International and Bedford 

St Pancras International and Bedford: Two trains per hour will run, calling at St Pancras International, West Hampstead Thameslink, St Albans City, Harpenden, Luton Airport Parkway, Luton, Leagrave, Harlington, Flitwick and Bedford only.

St Pancras International and Luton: Two trains per hour will run, calling at St Pancras International, Kentish Town, West Hampstead Thameslink, Cricklewood, Hendon, Mill Hill Broadway, Elstree & Borehamwood, Radlett, St Albans City, Harpenden, Luton Airport Parkway, Luton.

King’s Cross and Ely: One train per hour will run calling at King’s Cross, Finsbury Park, Potters Bar, Hatfield, Welwyn Garden City, Welwyn North, Knebworth, Stevenage, Hitchin, Letchworth Garden City, Baldock, Ashwell & Morden, Royston, Meldreth, Shepreth, Foxton, Cambridge, Cambridge North, Waterbeach, Ely only.

In addition to the above, one train per hour will run between Cambridge and Ely, calling at Cambridge, Cambridge North, Waterbeach and Ely only.

King’s Cross and Cambridge: One train per hour will run, calling at King’s Cross, Finsbury Park, Stevenage, Hitchin, Letchworth Garden City, Baldock, Ashwell & Morden, Royston and Cambridge only.

King’s Cross and Peterborough: Two trains per hour will run, calling at King’s Cross, Finsbury Park, Stevenage, Hitchin, Arlesey, Biggleswade, St Neots, Huntingdon and Peterborough only.

King’s Cross and Welwyn Garden City: Two trains per hour will run, calling at King’s Cross, Finsbury Park, Harringay, Hornsey, Alexandra Palace, New Southgate, Oakleigh Park, New Barnet, Hadley Wood, Potters Bar, Brookmans Park, Welham Green, Hatfield and Welwyn Garden City only.

King’s Cross and Stevenage: Two trains per hour will run, calling at King’s Cross, Finsbury Park, Harringay, Hornsey, Alexandra Palace, Bowes Park, Palmers Green, Winchmore Hill, Grange Park, Enfield Chase, Gordon Hill, Crews Hill, Cuffley, Bayford, Hertford North, Watton-at-Stone and Stevenage only.

Gatwick Express

Gatwick Express services will not run on Tuesday 21, Thursday 23 and Saturday 25 June due to the industrial action.

A statement on the Gatwick Express website said: ‘As this Industrial Action is affecting the whole country, we will be unable to provide alternatives such as replacement buses and ticket acceptance with other local rail and bus operators. 

‘We recognise that it will be very difficult to travel and our advice, regrettably, is to travel only if your journey is absolutely necessary. 

On Wednesday and Friday, outside of strike days, services will also be severely disrupted. 

Gatwick Express will run an amended Sunday service, no trains will start running before 07.15 and this means the first train may reach your station much later than this. 

‘This will allow us to run a more reliable and consistent service throughout the day,’ according to the Gatwick Express.

On Sunday (June 26), no trains will run before 07.15, however after that a regular Sunday service will run.  

LNER

LNER says over the strike dates it will be running around 38 per cent of its usual trains and they are likely to be very busy. ‘If you can avoid travelling over this period we recommend doing so,’ an LNER spokesperson said.

‘If you do need to travel, please check our website and journey planner before your journey.’

LNER will run limited services between London King’s Cross and Edinburgh Waveley. There will be no LNR services to Aberdeen, Inverness and Glasgow Central. 

There will also be no services to branch lines Bradford, Skipton, Harrowgate or Lincoln, Hull, Middlesborough and Sunderland.

LNER: The operator says it will be running only 38 per cent of its usual trains, with the last from London to Edinburgh at 2pm

LNER: The operator says it will be running only 38 per cent of its usual trains, with the last from London to Edinburgh at 2pm

Key information 

The last train from London King’s Cross to Edinburgh will be at 14:00

The last train from London King’s Cross to Leeds is at 15:05 (15:06 on Saturday)

The last train from Edinburgh to London is 12:30

The last last train from Leeds to London 15:45

CrossCountry

CrossCountry says it will run a significantly reduced service on Tuesday 21 June, Thursday 23 June and Saturday 25 June.

Days either side of the industrial action are also expected to be affected, the operator warns. The operator has suspended Advance tickets for the three strike dates.

A CrossCountry spokesperson said: ‘We will be permitting customers with a ticket on the dates Tuesday 21, Thursday 23 and Saturday 25 June 2022 to travel the day before or the two proceeding days. 

‘If you have a ticket to travel on June 21, June 23 or June 25 this will now also be valid for travel up to and including 20 June. Also it is required to travel at a similar time to your original ticket, following any time restrictions associated with it. 

CrossCountry says it will run a significantly reduced service on Tuesday 21 June, Thursday 23 June and Saturday 25 June

CrossCountry says it will run a significantly reduced service on Tuesday 21 June, Thursday 23 June and Saturday 25 June

CROSSCOUNTRY: Rail network will be running a 'significantly reduced service' on the strike days next week as shown above

CROSSCOUNTRY: Rail network will be running a ‘significantly reduced service’ on the strike days next week as shown above

There will be routes open, with a limited service, between Southampton Central and Manchester Piccadilly, as well as Plymouth and Bristol Parkway. Limited service between Birmingham New Street and Leicester, as well as Birmingham New Street and Edinburgh.

But lines between Nottingham and Cardiff Central will not run during the strike action. Trains will not run between Birmingham New Street and Bristol Temple Meads. 

End of the line services will not run on most lines. Services will not run between Plymouth and Penzance, Southampton Central and Bournemouth, and Leicester and Stansted Airport.

CrossCountry services will not run between Edinburgh and Glasgow Central and Edinburgh and Aberdeen.

EastMidlands

As a result of the strikes, EastMidlands will be operating a significantly reduced service on the three days.

‘We ask customers to only travel by rail if necessary. If you do decide to travel, plan ahead and leave extra time for disruption and short notice changes,’ a spokesperson said.

EastMidlands say the warning includes the days between strikes as they ‘will be running a reduced level of service’.

The operator also warned customers to ‘expect some disruption to the advertised service levels, particularly on Wednesday, Friday and Sunday’.

As a result of the strikes, EastMidlands will be operating a significantly reduced service on the three days

As a result of the strikes, EastMidlands will be operating a significantly reduced service on the three days

EMR Intercity

Between Nottingham and London: One Train Per Hour 

Between Sheffield and London: One Train Per Hour

Luton and London St Pancras: There will be no direct trains between Luton and London St Pancras Saturday 25 and Sunday 26 June due to pre-planned engineering work *unrelated to strike action.

EMR Connect

Between Corby and London: One Train Per Hour

EMR Regional

Between Derby and Matlock: One Train per Hour

Between Derby and Nottingham: One Train per Hour

Between Leicester and Nottingham (Stopping Service): One Train per Hour

Between Nottingham and Sheffield: One Train per Hour

All other lines of route will be closed – Rail Replacement Bus (RRB) services will not be provided.

EuroStar 

Due to a national strike across the UK railway network, EuroStar will be running a reduced timetable between 21 and 25 June.

Eurostar will cancel at least three trains a day between London and Paris, but trains will still continue between 8am and 4.30pm departing London on each of the three days – with an early train on Saturday.

Similar, some services on the London, Lille to Amsterdam line will be disrupted. 

Eurostar say you can exchange your booking for free for travel at a different time/date in the same travel class, cancel your booking and claim a Eurostar e-voucher valid for 12 months or claim a refund.

Grand Central 

On RMT strike days Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday Grand Central plan to run a reduced service on both our routes. 

Grand Central say reservations are compulsory on these days and customers without reservations will not be permitted to board. 

‘If your journey is disrupted on a strike day, you can travel the day before or after with any valid Grand Central ticket,’ said Grand Central

‘If your journey has been disrupted due to the strike actions you can change your travel plans or request a refund from you point of purchase fee free.’

Timetables for strike days pictured below: 

Great Western Railway

Great Western say they expect rail services to be ‘severely affected’ from 21 to 25 June. A significantly reduced temporary timetable will be in place.

A spokesperson said: ‘Only travel by rail if necessary. If you do travel, expect severe disruption and plan ahead. Services will start later and finish earlier throughout the strike period.’

On strike days, an extremely limited service will operate between 07:30 and 18:30. On non-strike days, no services will run before 07:00.

GWR says it will operate ‘as many trains as possible’ during the strike action however, most train services will be affected on the days announced. 

Great Western say they expect rail services to be 'severely affected' from 21 to 25 June. A significantly reduced temporary timetable will be in place

Great Western say they expect rail services to be ‘severely affected’ from 21 to 25 June. A significantly reduced temporary timetable will be in place

Due to the timing of the strike action, services in between strike days will also be affected, say GWR.

‘Where we are able to run services, they are expected to be extremely busy. We are not able to provide bus replacement services,’ a spokesperson added.

Very limited services will continue to run between Cardiff Central and London Paddington. Services on that line will also run to and from Oxford and to and from Basingstoke.

Very limited services will also run between London Paddington and Exeter St Davids, through Bristol, and on to Plymouth. 

No rail services will be able to operate on strike days on the following routes:

All lines in Cornwall, including all branch lines all branch lines in Devon (Barnstaple, Exmouth, Paignton, Okehampton)

South Wales main line (Carmarthen/Swansea – Cardiff Central)

Heart of Wessex line (Castle Cary – Weymouth)

Severn Beach line (Bristol Temple Meads – Severn Beach)

North Cotswolds line (Hereford/Worcester – Oxford)

South Cotswolds line (Cheltenham – Swindon)

Worcester/Gloucester – Bristol Kennet Valley (Reading – Pewsey)

North Downs line (Reading – Gatwick Airport)

South Coast (Westbury – Southampton/Portsmouth Harbour).

Greater Anglia 

Greater Anglia says none of its regional and branch lines trains will run on strike days and a very limited service will operate elsewhere – but only between 7.30am and 6.30pm – when all trains must have arrived at their final destination. 

Greater Anglia say there will be far fewer trains and they will be less frequent than normal. There will be no rail replacement bus services.

A spokesperson said: ‘You should only travel if absolutely necessary and if you do travel you should expect severe disruption and plan ahead. Find alternative ways to travel if you can.’

Greater Anglia is running a very limited service on our lines to and from Liverpool Street from 7.30am, with the last trains finishing their journeys by 6.30pm.

‘If you’re travelling back home from Liverpool Street your last train will leave London in time to reach its final destination by 6.30pm, so that could be before the end of your working day.’ 

‘We are very sorry about the inconvenience this may cause you’.

‘Unfortunately, there will be a knock-on effect on the day before and after each strike, so first train times will be later than usual. Also last train times on the days before strikes could be affected. Please check on our website, app or social media before you travel.’

There will be no services running on the following routes on Tuesday 21, Thursday 23 and Saturday 25 June

Between Norwich and Cambridge/Stansted Airport, Sheringham, Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth

Between Ipswich and Cambridge, Peterborough, Felixstowe and Lowestoft

Between Marks Tey and Sudbury

All other branch lines: Hertford East to Broxbourne, Braintree to Witham, Southminster to Wickford, Harwich Town to Manningtree, Clacton/Walton-on-the-Naze to Colchester, Colchester Town to Colchester, Meridian Water to Stratford.

Greater Anglia (pictured: Library image) says none of its regional and branch lines trains will run on strike days and a very limited service will operate elsewhere – but only between 7.30am and 6.30pm - when all trains must have arrived at their final destination

Greater Anglia (pictured: Library image) says none of its regional and branch lines trains will run on strike days and a very limited service will operate elsewhere – but only between 7.30am and 6.30pm – when all trains must have arrived at their final destination

A very limited and much reduced service – with fewer trains running and so fewer seats available – will run starting at 7.30am and finishing at 6.30pm on the following routes:

Norwich to London Liverpool Street intercity service: One train an hour, with first and last trains from Norwich to Liverpool Street at 08.00 and 16.00, and first and last trains from Liverpool Street to Norwich at 08.30 and 16.30.

Colchester to London Liverpool Street stopping service: One stopping train an hour plus one intercity service an hour, with the first and last stopping services from Colchester to London Liverpool Street at 07.30 and 16.25 and from London Liverpool Street to Colchester at 08.00 and 17.00.

Southend Victoria to London Liverpool Street: Two trains an hour with first and last trains from Southend Victoria to London Liverpool Street at 07.30 and 17.13, and from London Liverpool Street to Southend Victoria at 07.47 and 17.30.

Stansted Express Stansted Airport to London Liverpool Street: Two trains an hour (reducing to one train an hour on Thursday 23 June, when train drivers are also on strike), with first and last trains from Stansted Airport to London Liverpool Street at 07.42 and 17.12 and from London Liverpool Street to Stansted Airport at 08.10 and 17.40

Cambridge to London Liverpool Street: One train an hour with some possible further alterations on Thursday 23 June, when train drivers are also on strike, with the first trains from Cambridge to London Liverpool Street at 08.20 and 16.20 and from Cambridge North to London Liverpool Street at 09.13 and 16.13. First and last trains from Liverpool Street to Cambridge/Cambridge North at 08.25 and 16.25/15.25.

Heathrow Express 

Due to a planned rail strike, Heathrow Express services will be significantly affected between 21st and 25th June.

A spokesperson said: ‘Please allow additional time when travelling on these days.

‘Customers who have already purchased tickets on strike days can claim a full refund or amend their ticket if required.’

Tuesday 21st June 22, a half hourly service will operate between 07:30 and 18:30

From London Paddington: Services are departing at 10 and 40 minutes past the hour, first service will depart at 07:40, last service will depart at 18:10

From Heathrow Terminal 5: Services are departing at 27 and 57 minutes past the hour, first service will depart at 07:30, last service will depart at 17:57

From Heathrow Central: Services are departing at 32 and 02 minutes past the hour, first service will depart at 07:35, last service will depart at 18:00

Thursday 23 June 22, a half hourly service will operate between 07:30 and 18:30

From London Paddington: Services are departing at 10 and 40 minutes past the hour, first service will depart at 07:40, last service will depart at 18:10

From Heathrow Terminal 5: Services are departing at 27 and 57 minutes past the hour, first service will depart at 07:30, last service will depart at 17:57

From Heathrow Central: Services are departing at 32 and 02 minutes past the hour, first service will depart at 07:35, last service will depart at 18:02

Saturday 25 June 22, a half hourly service will operate between 07:30 and 18:30

From London Paddington: Services are departing at 10 and 40 minutes past the hour, first service will depart at 07:40, last service will depart at 18:10

From Heathrow Terminal 5: Services are departing at 27 and 57 minutes past the hour, first service will depart at 07:30, last service will depart at 17:57

From Heathrow Central: Services are departing at 32 and 02 minutes past the hour, first service will depart at 07:35, last service will depart at 18:02

Northern 

Northern says on strike days there will be ‘extremely limited availability of both train crew and signalling staff’ and as such they ‘will not be able to operate services on most routes’. 

There will be no replacement buses or alternative travel provided, Northern have warned.

A spokesperson said: ‘Customer safety is our priority, we advise you not to travel between Tuesday 21 and Sunday 26 June and make alternative plans.

‘Unfortunately, as we will not be able to position our fleet how we normally would, the significant impact of the strike will also be felt on non-strike days. 

‘Therefore, we regrettably advise customers not to travel on any day from Tuesday 21 through to Sunday 26 June.

‘Where we are able to operate trains, services will be very limited, and trains will not start as early as normal and will finish much earlier than normal.’

Northern say these services will still run, with delays, on the three strike days: 

Darlington to Saltburn 

Liverpool Lime Street to Alderley Edge  

York to Leeds

Ilkley to Bradford Foster Square to Leeds

Skipton to Bradford Foster Square to Leeds

Leeds to Sheffield

Leeds to Bradford Foster Square

All other Northern services will NOT run on strike days.

ScotRail 

ScotRail says that as a result of the strike there will be a very limited number of services operating on just five ScotRail routes in the Central Belt, with no service on all other routes.

A spoksperson said: ‘This dispute does not involve ScotRail staff, however it will have a major knock-on effect on the train operator’s ability to provide services as the RMT planned action will involve Network Rail staff in Scotland.’

ScotRail  (pictured: Library image) says that as a result of the strike there will be a very limited number of services operating on just five ScotRail routes in the Central Belt, with no service on all other routes

ScotRail  (pictured: Library image) says that as a result of the strike there will be a very limited number of services operating on just five ScotRail routes in the Central Belt, with no service on all other routes

Services will only operate on five routes. And for the routes on which we will operate a service, customers should only travel if they really need to and should consider alternative options where possible, according to ScotRail.

The railway will only be operational between 07.30 and 18.30 on 21, 23, and 25 June. The below services will run on these days:

Edinburgh – Glasgow via Falkirk High: Two trains per hour

Edinburgh – Bathgate: Two trains per hour

Glasgow – Hamilton/Larkhall: Two trains per hour

Glasgow – Lanark: Two trains per hour

Edinburgh – Glasgow via Shotts: One train per hour

Final services will depart well before 18.30, so customers should plan ahead to ensure they know when their last train will run.

SouthWestern Railway  

SouthWestern Railway says it will run a dramatically reduced timetable on strike days, with significant parts of the network closed.

A late-starting Sunday level of service will operate across the network on 22, 24 and 26 June, and customers are urged only to travel by rail if absolutely necessary between 21 and 26 June.

‘We are sorry for the disruption these strikes will cause and thank you for your patience and understanding as the rail industry works to bring this damaging nationwide action to an end,’ a spokesperson said.

A severely limited service will run between 07:15 and 18:30 on some routes, with the rest of the network closed

Where trains are running, they are expected to be very busy ‘As a result, you are urged not to travel by rail unless absolutely necessary,’ the spokesperson said.

SOUTH WESTERN RAILWAY: There will be no trains beyond Southampton to Weymouth; or beyond Basingstoke to Exeter

SOUTH WESTERN RAILWAY: There will be no trains beyond Southampton to Weymouth; or beyond Basingstoke to Exeter

On strike days, SWR will run: 

Waterloo to Southampton: Two fast trains per hour each way

First train from Waterloo: 0730 – Last train from Waterloo: 1700

First train from Southampton: 0730 – Last train from Southampton: 1659  

Waterloo to Woking: Four trains per hour each way

First train from Waterloo: 0720 – Last train from Waterloo: 1750

First train from Woking: 0718 – Last train from Woking: 1748

Waterloo to Basingstoke: Two trains per hour each way

First train from Waterloo: 0715 – Last train from Waterloo: 1715

First train from Basingstoke: 0724 – Last train from Basingstoke: 1654

Waterloo to Windsor: Four trains per hour each way

First train from Waterloo: 0715 – Last train from Waterloo: 1722

First train from Windsor: 0730 – Last train from Windsor: 1730  

SouthEastern

SouthEastern are warning customers to expect ‘significant disruption’ across the network. 

‘Most of our stations and routes will be closed and we will only be able to run a severely reduced service,’ a spokesperson said.

‘Only travel by rail if necessary. If you do travel, expect severe disruption and plan ahead. We strongly recommend you plan ahead and make alternative plans.’

SOUTHEASTERN - Limited services set to run between London, Kent and East Sussex next week on June 21, 23 and 25

SOUTHEASTERN – Limited services set to run between London, Kent and East Sussex next week on June 21, 23 and 25

The operator also said services will also be affected on the days following the industrial action, particularly in the mornings.

Southeastern will continue to run its three Dartford lines, with a delayed service, between Datford and London Bridge. That includes the route via Bexleyheath, the line via Sidcup and the line via Woolwich.

Southeatern will also run its High Speed via Ashford and London St Pancras, as well as its Orpington line to London Bridge.

Stansted Express 

Stansted Express is advising people to only travel if absolutely necessary and are warning customers to expect severe disruption.

‘If the strikes go ahead, services running will only operate from 7.30am, with the last trains finishing their journeys by 6.30pm.

‘There will be two trains an hour (reducing to one train an hour on Thursday 23 June, when train drivers are also on strike).

The first and last trains from Stansted Airport to London Liverpool Street are 07.42 and 17.12

The first and last trains from London Liverpool Street to Stansted Airport are 08.10 and 17.40

There will be no services running from Stansted Airport to Norwich and Cambridge on these dates.

The 24-hour strikes will also have a knock-on effect on services on days immediately before and after the days when industrial action is taking place, so customers are advised to check before they travel on Monday 20, Wednesday 22, Friday 24 and Sunday 26 June.

TransPenine Express 

TransPennine Express (TPE) is asking customers to plan carefully ahead of the planned RMT strike action taking. It says it will put on an amended timetable on these dates, which will see a significant reduction in available services

TransPennine Express (TPE) is asking customers to plan carefully ahead of the planned RMT strike action taking. It says it will put on an amended timetable on these dates, which will see a significant reduction in available services

TransPennine Express (TPE) is asking customers to plan carefully ahead of the planned RMT strike action taking.

It says it will put on an amended timetable on these dates, which will see a significant reduction in available services. 

‘We’re advising customers to only travel if journeys are essential and to seek alternative means of transport if possible.

‘There will also be significant disruption on days between strike action (Wednesday 22 and Friday 24 June) and customers are asked to plan carefully and to check timetables before travelling,’ a spokesperson said.

TPE will be operating a very limited service on the following routes from Tuesday 21 until Saturday 25 June: 

Manchester Piccadilly to York

Manchester Airport to Preston

Newcastle to Edinburgh

Sheffield to Cleethorpes

Services will not run between:

Liverpool Lime Street and Glasgow Central

Edinburgh or between Lime Street to Stalybridge. 

Services will not run between York and Newcastle, as well as to branch lines of Hull, Scarborough and Saltburn.

There will also be no link services between Manchester Airport and the Stalybridge line, as well as to Sheffield through Stockport.

Transport for Greater Manchester

All lines will run to their usual frequency and times, except the Altrincham to Timperley line which will only be from 7am to 7pm on the three strike dates, and at a 12-minute frequency. 

Transport for Wales

Transport for Wales is advising customers not to travel by train on 21, 23 and 25 June, with the majority of its rail services suspended as a result of industrial action resulting from the dispute between RMT and Network Rail.

Due to the wider disruption caused, the operator is also advising customers to only travel by rail if essential for 20, 22, 24 and 26 June.

‘TfW is not in dispute with RMT, but the industrial action means we’re unable to operate rail services on Network Rail infrastructure,’

It is advising: 

Tuesday 21st June: No rail services* – do not travel by rail

Thursday 23 June: No rail services* – do not travel by rail

Saturday 25 June: No rail services* – do not travel by rail

The only services running will be: on 21 and 23 June, a reduced service between Radyr and Treherbert, Aberdare and Merthyr Tydfil, with replacement bus services between Radyr and Cardiff Central. 

On 25 June, a reduced service between Radyr and Treherbert, Aberdare and Pontypridd, with replacement buses in operation between Radyr and Cardiff Central, and between Pontypridd and Merthyr Tydfil due to the ongoing transformation work for the South Wales Metro. 

West Midlands Railway 

West Midlands Railway say the strike will have ‘considerable impact on the number of trains we are able to run’. 

A spokesperson said: ‘We will be running a very limited service on these dates between 7.30am and 6.30pm only.

‘Due to the knock-on impact of the strike, a very limited service will also be running on Wednesday 22 June 2022 and Friday 24 June 2022.

‘Our advice to customers is to only travel during this time if your journey is essential and you have no other means of transport available. If you do travel, expect severe disruption and plan ahead.’

The updated timetable due to the strike action 

Lichfield Trent Valley to Redditch / Bromsgrove (Cross City): Two trains per hour between Tuesday and Saturday and with normal service Sunday

Leamington to Nuneaton: No service between Tuesday and Saturday

Birmingham Snow Hill to Leamington / Stratford (Snow Hill lines): No service between Tuesday and Saturday

Birmingham Snow Hill to Kidderminster / Worcester inc. Stourbridge Shuttle (Snow Hill lines): No service between Tuesday and Saturday and one train per hour on Monday

Birmingham New Street to Hereford: No service between Tuesday and Saturday

Birmingham New Street to Shrewsbury: No service between Tuesday and Saturday

Birmingham New Street to Walsall / Rugeley: No service on strike days and no service between Walsall and Rugeley on non-strike days

Birmingham New Street to Wolverhampton: One train per hour on strike days and two trains per hour on non-strike days between Tuesday and Saturday

Birmingham New Street to Birmingham International: One train per hour between Tuesday and Saturday 



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